Styx and Stones

Few words today. There's commentary on the last image, but I prefer to let these photos speak for themselves. I would add that I managed to get these with the entire front row of the theater inviting themselves into the barricaded photo pit. No hard feelings or anything, but it added a challenge I'd never dealt with before, which makes me even happier with these images. 

  He doesn't want to hear about it anymore.

He doesn't want to hear about it anymore.

  The Garlic Trompet From Hell Strikes Back!!

The Garlic Trompet From Hell Strikes Back!!

  Would you believe this guy is old enough to retire? 

Would you believe this guy is old enough to retire? 

  Larry teaches Tommy a song Tommy wrote while James struggles to reinsert a contact lens.

Larry teaches Tommy a song Tommy wrote while James struggles to reinsert a contact lens.

  Me? A rock star?

Me? A rock star?

Any seasoned concert or performance photographer will instinctively avoid subjects lit in red or green. They're nice, dramatic colors and everything, but they are also great for removing detail from a subject. It's true that use of filters or creative RAW processing can help restore some of that lost detail, and I don't know any photographers that don't love the recent shift from tungsten lights to LEDs, but those wavelengths usually equal Death From the Rafters. It looks cool for the audience, but just try to take a decent shot. It's tough. 

A single white or yellow spot lighting a single performer on a stage awash in one of those cursed colors, though, can give you this:

  The spotlight saves this image. Really. 

The spotlight saves this image. Really.